Photo of Ivo  Kalajzic, M.D., Ph.D.

Ivo Kalajzic, M.D., Ph.D.

Professor of Reconstructive Sciences
Center for Regenerative Medicine and Skeletal Development
Professor, Department of Genetics and Genome Sciences
Academic Office Location:
Reconstructive Sciences
UConn Health
263 Farmington Avenue
Farmington, CT 06030-3705
Phone: 860-679-6051
Fax: 860-679-2910
Website(s):

Skeletal Biology and Regeneration Graduate Program

Education
DegreeInstitutionMajor
M.D.Zagreb University School of MedicineMedicine
Ph.D.Split University School of MedicineBasic Medical Sciences - Genetics

Awards
Name of Award/HonorAwarding Organization
Career Enhancement AwardAmerican Society of Bone and Mineral Research
Harold Frost Young Investigator AwardAmerican Society of Bone and Mineral Research
Young Investigator Award, Annual MeetingAmerican Society of Bone and Mineral Research
Fellowship AwardChildren Brittle Bone Foundation
John Haddad Young Investigator AwardAmerican Society of Bone and Mineral Research
Outstanding Presentation Award, Washington, DCEast Coast Connective Tissue Society Meeting
Michael Geisman Fellowship Award Osteogenesis Imperfecta Foundation
Name & DescriptionCategoryRoleTypeScopeStart YearEnd Year
Orthopedic Research SocietyProfessional/Scientific OrganizationMemberExternalNational2012
American Society of Bone and Mineral ResearchProfessional/Scientific OrganizationMemberExternalNational2006
International Chinese Hard Tissue SocietyProfessional/Scientific OrganizationMemberExternalInternational2006

“Growth factor based enhancement of bone repair”


Our project will define the signaling mechanisms by which PDGF regulate BMP induced osteogenesis using in vitro and in vivo models. Understanding how these two critical factors for interact can pave the way for more targeted therapies in future. In addition, we will evaluate the efficacy of combining these two clinically approved growth factors, BMP2 and PDGF, with the aim of improving healing, and reducing BMP2 dosage to prevent complications and reduce cost.


“Notch signaling and bone fracture healing”


The effects of Notch signaling modulation will be evaluated In vivo using stage specific Notch gain- and loss-of-function models during fracture healing. We postulate that inhibition of Notch will provide evidence for potential future application to accelerate or improve fracture healing. Our results will provide a better understanding of the role of Notch signaling during fracture healing and will evaluate the potential for therapeutic modulation of the healing process. 


“Transplantation of Mesenchymal Stem Cells as therapy for Osteogenesis Imperfecta”,


This purpose of this project is to test the efficacy of direct intrabone transplantation of mesenchymal stem cells as a therapeutic approach for osteogenesis imperfecta.

Not accepting lab rotation students at this time

Journal Articles

Conference Papers

Reviews