Brenton R. Graveley, Ph.D.

Professor, Genetics and Developmental Biology
Academic Office Location:
Genetics & Developmental Biology
University of Connecticut Health Center
400 Farmington Avenue
Farmington, CT 06030-6403
Phone: 860-679-2090
Fax: 860-679-8345
Email: graveley@neuron.uchc.edu
Website(s): Cell Biology Graduate Program
Genetics & Developmental Biology Graduate Program
Graveley Lab Page

Education
DegreeInstitutionMajor
Ph.D.University of VermontMicro. and Mol. Gen.
B.A.University of ColoradoMol. Cell. Dev. Biol.

Post-Graduate Training
TrainingInstitutionSpecialty
FellowshipAmerican Cancer Society Undergraduate Fellowship
FellowshipHoward Hughes Medical Institute Undergraduate Fellowship
FellowshipColorado Commission on Higher Education Fellowship
FellowshipUndergraduate Research Opportunity Fellowship
PostdoctoralDepartment of Molecular and Cellular Biology, Harvard University, Laboratory of Tom ManiatisPostdoctoral Fellow
FellowshipJane Coffin Childs Memorial FundMedical Research Postdoctoral Fellowship
My laboratory studies a wide variety of experiments that can be grouped into five broad areas: Alternative Splicing Regulatory Networks in Drosophila In eukaryotes, genes are organized into segments referred to as exons and introns. When genes are transcribed into messenger RNA (mRNA), the exons are joined together and the introns are spliced out. The majority of eukaryotic genes contain multiple exons and introns. In such cases, the exons can be joined together in different patterns in a process called alternative splicing to generate multiple mRNAs from a single gene, each of which can encode a protein with a distinct function. Alternative splicing is a common means by which eukaryotes regulate gene expression and is the primary means of enhancing the diversity of proteins encoded in the genome. In addition, defects in alternative splicing can result in the onset of many human diseases including cancer, Alzheimer’s disease, and myotonic dystrophy. Thus, understanding the mechanisms by which alternative splicing is regulated is of tremendous importance to human health. My laboratory is interested in all aspects of the regulation of alternative splicing in Drosophila melanogaster. Drosophila is an excellent system in which to study alternative splicing due to the ability to use cutting-edge genetic, biochemical, tissue culture, and genomic technologies. In addition, the majority of the genes involved in the regulation of alternative splicing are shared between humans and flies. Thus, the principals we learn by studying this process in Drosophila are directly applicable to the regulation of alternative splicing in humans. Alternative Splicing in Human Embryonic Stem Cells Cells and organisms function based on the expression patterns, actions, and interactions of thousands of genes and their products. A tremendous amount of work has gone into dissecting the transcriptional regulatory and protein interaction networks that drive cell function. However, one important aspect of gene regulation is often overlooked in these studies - alternative splicing. Alternative splicing is the process by which exons can be joined together in different patterns to generate multiple mRNAs from a single gene. Alternative splicing is a tremendously important mechanism by which eukaryotes regulate gene expression and is the primary means of enhancing the diversity of proteins encoded by the genome. It is currently estimated that as many as 75 percent of human genes encode pre-mRNAs that are alternative spliced to generate multiple mRNAs, each of which can potentially encode a protein with a distinct function. Thus, just like transcription regulation, alternative splicing can function as a developmental switch. A number of microarray studies have been conducted to identify a set of stemness genes - genes that are expressed in and define the core gene regulatory program for all types of stem cells. While these studies have led to the identification of a number of genes that play important roles in controlling various aspects of stem cell biology, they have not examined alternative splicing in stem cells. Thus, a crucial aspect of the gene regulatory programs of all types of human stem cells has been overlooked. The goal of our work is to fill this gap by performing expression profiling experiments of hES cells in their undifferentiated state and as they differentiate down different lineage pathways using microarrays that can monitor alternative splicing and to elucidate the role of specific RNA binding proteins in controlling alternative splicing in hES cells. These experiments should lead to a more complete understanding of the gene expression programs of hES cells which is critical to our ability to guide stem cells down different lineage pathways and to realizing the full therapeutic potential of hES cells. Alternative Splicing of the Drosophila Dscam Pre-mRNA A major project in the laboratory is to determine the mechanisms involved in controlling alternative splicing of the Drosophila Down Syndrome Cell Adhesion Molecule (Dscam) gene. The Dscam gene, which was discovered in Larry Zipurskys lab, encodes an axon guidance receptor that is most similar to one of the human genes implicated in causing Down Syndrome. Perhaps the most interesting aspect of this gene is that it is the most extensively alternatively spliced gene that we know of in any organism. This single gene can generate over 38,000 different isoforms by virtue of extensive alternative splicing. In fact, the number of proteins generated by this gene is two to three times the number of genes in the entire Drosophila genome! It is thought that the diversity of Dscam isoforms contributes to the specificity of neuronal wiring. We have found that the alternative splicing of Dscam transcripts is regulated throughout development and in a tissue-specific manner. Moreover, this regulated alternative splicing is evolutionarily conserved. We are now using RNAi, genetics, evolutionary, and biochemical approaches to identify trans-acting factors and cis-acting RNA sequences that participate in controlling this extraordinarily complex alternative splicing event. By performing an RNAi screen in which we depleted hundreds of RNA binding proteins in the Drosophila genome, we have identified about 40 different proteins that regulate the splicing of various Dscam exons. We have also identified several splicing regulatory elements that are required for the inclusion of any alternative exons and we are currently working to identify the mechanisms by which these elements act. In addition, we are using a variety of techniques to determine the role of the different Dscam isoforms in specifying axon guidance in the fly. Although there are differences in the properties of the human and Drosophila Dscam proteins, these studies may lead to insights regarding the role of this gene in the development of Down syndrome in humans. The Drosophila modENCODE Project The goal of this project is to generate a comprehensive list of all the sequence-based functional elements in the Drosophila genome. This will be done by generating a set of developmentally staged and tissue- and cell-specific RNAs for expression profiling using high-density genome tiling microarrays and 454 pyrosequencing of small RNAs. These expression data will be used for sophisticated transcript modeling that integrates extant EST and cDNA sequence and comparative data from the 12 sequenced Drosophila genomes. These gene models will be experimentally validated and functionally analyzed in RNAi assays. The final product of these efforts will include comprehensive annotations of transcription start sites, exon/intron structures, polyadenylation sites and the cis-elements required for splicing. The Role of microRNAs in Planarian Regeneration Planarians are free-living flat worms that are best known for their regenerative capacity. For example, after surgical bisection of the animal in either the vertical or horizontal plane each half of the animal will regenerate the missing structures. In fact, a fragment as small as 1/279th the size of the original individual has the capacity to regenerate into an entire animal. The key to the amazing regenerative prowess of these creatures is a population of cells known as neoblasts that are distributed throughout the body of the animal. Neoblasts are totipotent cells that are the only dividing cells in the animal. The division progeny of neoblasts replace cells lost during normal cellular turnover in the animal. After injury, however, neoblasts migrate to the wound site, divide, and their progeny eventually replace the missing structures. Thus, neoblasts are the planarian equivalent of stem cells making these unique organisms an excellent model system for studying stem cell biology.

Not Accepting Lab Rotation Studentsat this time

A wide variety of potential rotation projects in the general areas of post-transcriptional gene regulation (i.e., the RNA world) are available to highly motivated students. Please contact me to discuss potential projects or even better, to suggest a project of your own.

Journal Articles

Books

  • B.J. Blencowe and B.R. Graveley Alternative Splicing in the Postgenomic Era 2008 Jan;

Book Chapters

  • One Gene, Many Products.
    Graveley, B.R. The Implicit Genome 2006 Jan;385 p.

Conference Papers

Other

  • Evolution of genes and genomes on the Drosophila phylogeny.
    Clark, Andrew G; Eisen, Michael B; Smith, Douglas R; Bergman, Casey M; Oliver, Brian; Markow, Therese A; Kaufman, Thomas C; Kellis, Manolis; Gelbart, William; Iyer, Venky N; Pollard, Daniel A; Sackton, Timothy B; Larracuente, Amanda M; Singh, Nadia D; Abad, Jose P; Abt, Dawn N; Adryan, Boris; Aguade, Montserrat; Akashi, Hiroshi; Anderson, Wyatt W; Aquadro, Charles F; Ardell, David H; Arguello, Roman; Artieri, Carlo G; Barbash, Daniel A; Barker, Daniel; Barsanti, Paolo; Batterham, Phil; Batzoglou, Serafim; Begun, Dave; Bhutkar, Arjun; Blanco, Enrico; Bosak, Stephanie A; Bradley, Robert K; Brand, Adrianne D; Brent, Michael R; Brooks, Angela N; Brown, Randall H; Butlin, Roger K; Caggese, Corrado; Calvi, Brian R; Bernardo de Carvalho, A; Caspi, Anat; Castrezana, Sergio; Celniker, Susan E; Chang, Jean L; Chapple, Charles; Chatterji, Sourav; Chinwalla, Asif; Civetta, Alberto; Clifton, Sandra W; Comeron, Josep M; Costello, James C; Coyne, Jerry A; Daub, Jennifer; David, Robert G; Delcher, Arthur L; Delehaunty, Kim; Do, Chuong B; Ebling, Heather; Edwards, Kevin; Eickbush, Thomas; Evans, Jay D; Filipski, Alan; Findeiss, Sven; Freyhult, Eva; Fulton, Lucinda; Fulton, Robert; Garcia, Ana C L; Gardiner, Anastasia; Garfield, David A; Garvin, Barry E; Gibson, Greg; Gilbert, Don; Gnerre, Sante; Godfrey, Jennifer; Good, Robert; Gotea, Valer; Gravely, Brenton; Greenberg, Anthony J; Griffiths-Jones, Sam; Gross, Samuel; Guigo, Roderic; Gustafson, Erik A; Haerty, Wilfried; Hahn, Matthew W; Halligan, Daniel L; Halpern, Aaron L; Halter, Gillian M; Han, Mira V; Heger, Andreas; Hillier, LaDeana; Hinrichs, Angie S; Holmes, Ian; Hoskins, Roger A; Hubisz, Melissa J; Hultmark, Dan; Huntley, Melanie A; Jaffe, David B; Jagadeeshan, Santosh; Jeck, William R; Johnson, Justin; Jones, Corbin D; Jordan, William C; Karpen, Gary H; Kataoka, Eiko; Keightley, Peter D; Kheradpour, Pouya; Kirkness, Ewen F; Koerich, Leonardo B; Kristiansen, Karsten; Kudrna, Dave; Kulathinal, Rob J; Kumar, Sudhir; Kwok, Roberta; Lander, Eric; Langley, Charles H; Lapoint, Richard; Lazzaro, Brian P; Lee, So-Jeong; Levesque, Lisa; Li, Ruiqiang; Lin, Chiao-Feng; Lin, Michael F; Lindblad-Toh, Kerstin; Llopart, Ana; Long, Manyuan; Low, Lloyd; Lozovsky, Elena; Lu, Jian; Luo, Meizhong; Machado, Carlos A; Makalowski, Wojciech; Marzo, Mar; Matsuda, Muneo; Matzkin, Luciano; McAllister, Bryant; McBride, Carolyn S; McKernan, Brendan; McKernan, Kevin; Mendez-Lago, Maria; Minx, Patrick; Mollenhauer, Michael U; Montooth, Kristi; Mount, Stephen M; Mu, Xu; Myers, Eugene; Negre, Barbara; Newfeld, Stuart; Nielsen, Rasmus; Noor, Mohamed A F; O'Grady, Patrick; Pachter, Lior; Papaceit, Montserrat; Parisi, Matthew J; Parisi, Michael; Parts, Leopold; Pedersen, Jakob S; Pesole, Graziano; Phillippy, Adam M; Ponting, Chris P; Pop, Mihai; Porcelli, Damiano; Powell, Jeffrey R; Prohaska, Sonja; Pruitt, Kim; Puig, Marta; Quesneville, Hadi; Ram, Kristipati Ravi; Rand, David; Rasmussen, Matthew D; Reed, Laura K; Reenan, Robert; Reily, Amy; Remington, Karin A; Rieger, Tania T; Ritchie, Michael G; Robin, Charles; Rogers, Yu-Hui; Rohde, Claudia; Rozas, Julio; Rubenfield, Marc J; Ruiz, Alfredo; Russo, Susan; Salzberg, Steven L; Sanchez-Gracia, Alejandro; Saranga, David J; Sato, Hajime; Schaeffer, Stephen W; Schatz, Michael C; Schlenke, Todd; Schwartz, Russell; Segarra, Carmen; Singh, Rama S; Sirot, Laura; Sirota, Marina; Sisneros, Nicholas B; Smith, Chris D; Smith, Temple F; Spieth, John; Stage, Deborah E; Stark, Alexander; Stephan, Wolfgang; Strausberg, Robert L; Strempel, Sebastian; Sturgill, David; Sutton, Granger; Sutton, Granger G; Tao, Wei; Teichmann, Sarah; Tobari, Yoshiko N; Tomimura, Yoshihiko; Tsolas, Jason M; Valente, Vera L S; Venter, Eli; Venter, J Craig; Vicario, Saverio; Vieira, Filipe G; Vilella, Albert J; Villasante, Alfredo; Walenz, Brian; Wang, Jun; Wasserman, Marvin; Watts, Thomas; Wilson, Derek; Wilson, Richard K; Wing, Rod A; Wolfner, Mariana F; Wong, Alex; Wong, Gane Ka-Shu; Wu, Chung-I; Wu, Gabriel; Yamamoto, Daisuke; Yang, Hsiao-Pei; Yang, Shiaw-Pyng; Yorke, James A; Yoshida, Kiyohito; Zdobnov, Evgeny; Zhang, Peili; Zhang, Yu; Zimin, Aleksey V; Baldwin, Jennifer; Abdouelleil, Amr; Abdulkadir, Jamal; Abebe, Adal; Abera, Brikti; Abreu, Justin; Acer, St Christophe; Aftuck, Lynne; Alexander, Allen; An, Peter; Anderson, Erica; Anderson, Scott; Arachi, Harindra; Azer, Marc; Bachantsang, Pasang; Barry, Andrew; Bayul, Tashi; Berlin, Aaron; Bessette, Daniel; Bloom, Toby; Blye, Jason; Boguslavskiy, Leonid; Bonnet, Claude; Boukhgalter, Boris; Bourzgui, Imane; Brown, Adam; Cahill, Patrick; Channer, Sheridon; Cheshatsang, Yama; Chuda, Lisa; Citroen, Mieke; Collymore, Alville; Cooke, Patrick; Costello, Maura; D'Aco, Katie; Daza, Riza; De Haan, Georgius; DeGray, Stuart; DeMaso, Christina; Dhargay, Norbu; Dooley, Kimberly; Dooley, Erin; Doricent, Missole; Dorje, Passang; Dorjee, Kunsang; Dupes, Alan; Elong, Richard; Falk, Jill; Farina, Abderrahim; Faro, Susan; Ferguson, Diallo; Fisher, Sheila; Foley, Chelsea D; Franke, Alicia; Friedrich, Dennis; Gadbois, Loryn; Gearin, Gary; Gearin, Christina R; Giannoukos, Georgia; Goode, Tina; Graham, Joseph; Grandbois, Edward; Grewal, Sharleen; Gyaltsen, Kunsang; Hafez, Nabil; Hagos, Birhane; Hall, Jennifer; Henson, Charlotte; Hollinger, Andrew; Honan, Tracey; Huard, Monika D; Hughes, Leanne; Hurhula, Brian; Husby, M Erii; Kamat, Asha; Kanga, Ben; Kashin, Seva; Khazanovich, Dmitry; Kisner, Peter; Lance, Krista; Lara, Marcia; Lee, William; Lennon, Niall; Letendre, Frances; LeVine, Rosie; Lipovsky, Alex; Liu, Xiaohong; Liu, Jinlei; Liu, Shangtao; Lokyitsang, Tashi; Lokyitsang, Yeshi; Lubonja, Rakela; Lui, Annie; MacDonald, Pen; Magnisalis, Vasilia; Maru, Kebede; Matthews, Charles; McCusker, William; McDonough, Susan; Mehta, Teena; Meldrim, James; Meneus, Louis; Mihai, Oana; Mihalev, Atanas; Mihova, Tanya; Mittelman, Rachel; Mlenga, Valentine; Montmayeur, Anna; Mulrain, Leonidas; Navidi, Adam; Naylor, Jerome; Negash, Tamrat; Nguyen, Thu; Nguyen, Nga; Nicol, Robert; Norbu, Choe; Norbu, Nyima; Novod, Nathaniel; O'Neill, Barry; Osman, Sahal; Markiewicz, Eva; Oyono, Otero L; Patti, Christopher; Phunkhang, Pema; Pierre, Fritz; Priest, Margaret; Raghuraman, Sujaa; Rege, Filip; Reyes, Rebecca; Rise, Cecil; Rogov, Peter; Ross, Keenan; Ryan, Elizabeth; Settipalli, Sampath; Shea, Terry; Sherpa, Ngawang; Shi, Lu; Shih, Diana; Sparrow, Todd; Spaulding, Jessica; Stalker, John; Stange-Thomann, Nicole; Stavropoulos, Sharon; Stone, Catherine; Strader, Christopher; Tesfaye, Senait; Thomson, Talene; Thoulutsang, Yama; Thoulutsang, Dawa; Topham, Kerri; Topping, Ira; Tsamla, Tsamla; Vassiliev, Helen; Vo, Andy; Wangchuk, Tsering; Wangdi, Tsering; Weiand, Michael; Wilkinson, Jane; Wilson, Adam; Yadav, Shailendra; Young, Geneva; Yu, Qing; Zembek, Lisa; Zhong, Danni; Zimmer, Andrew; Zwirko, Zac; Jaffe, David B; Alvarez, Pablo; Brockman, Will; Butler, Jonathan; Chin, CheeWhye; Gnerre, Sante; Grabherr, Manfred; Kleber, Michael; Mauceli, Evan; MacCallum, Iain Nature 2007 Nov;450(7167):203-18
  • Sex, AGility, and the regulation of alternative splicing.
    Graveley, Brenton R Cell 2002 May;109(4):409-12

Reviews

Short Surveys

Title or AbstractTypeSponsor/EventDate/YearLocation
Insights into RNA Biology in Drosophila from Genome-Wide StudiesTalkDept. Biochemistry & Biophysics, UPenn School of Medicine2013Philadelphia, PA
Insights into RNA Biology in Drosophila from Genome-Wide StudiesTalkDept. of Molecular Genetics and Microbiology, University of Florida2013Gainesville, FL
Insights into RNA Biology in Drosophila from Genome-Wide StudiesTalkDepartment of Molecular Biology and Genetics, Cornell University2013Ithica, NY
Genomic Approaches to Studying Alternative Splicing in Drosophila.TalkNIH, NIDDK2012Bethesda, MD
Genomic Approaches to Studying Alternative Splicing in Drosophila.TalkMIT, Department of Biology. 2012Cambridge, MA
Genomic Approaches to Studying Alternative Splicing in Drosophila.TalkUMDNJ, Department of Biology2012Newark, NJ
Genomic Approaches to Studying Alternative Splicing in Drosophila.TalkCase Western Reserve University, RNA Center2012Cleveland, OH
Genomic Approaches to Studying Alternative Splicing in Drosophila.TalkBrown University, Department of Biology2012Providence, RI
Genomic Approaches to Studying Alternative Splicing in Drosophila.TalkJohn Hopkins University, Department of Biology. 2012Baltimore, MD
Post Transcriptional Regulation of Gene Expression. TalkGordon Conference2012Newport, RI
ModENCODE SymposiumTalkNHGRI/NIH2012Bethesda, MD
Genome-wide Analysis of Alternative Splicing in Drosophila.TalkRNA 20122012Ann Arbor, MI
Genome-wide Analysis of Alternative Splicing in Drosophila.TalkCold Spring Harbor Laboratories2012Cold Spring Harbor, NY
Genomic Approaches to Studying RNA Processing in Drosophila.TalkDrosophila 20122012Chicago, IL
Genomic approaches to the study of RNA processing in DrosophilaTalkCell Press, Regulatory RNAs2011Chicago, IL
Genomic approaches to the study of RNA processing in DrosophilaTalkJohn Hopkins University, Department of Biology2011John Hopkins University, Baltimore, MD
Genomic approaches to the study of RNA processing in DrosophilaTalkUniversity of Colorado, Boulder, MCDB Department2011Boulder, CO
Genome wide analysis of mRNA processing in DrosophilaTalkGordon Conference - Nucleic Acids2011Biddeford, ME
Genome wide analysis of mRNA processing in DrosophilaTalkUniversity of California, Irvine2011Irvine, CA
Genome wide analysis of mRNA processing in DrosophilaTalkUniversity of California, Los Angeles2011Los Angeles, CA
Alternative Splicing in Drosophila.TalkUniversity of Colorado2011Colorado
Alternative Splicing in Drosophila.TalkUniversity of California2011Los Angeles, California
Alternative Splicing in Drosophila.TalkUniversity of California2011Irvine, California
Dynamics and Diversity of the Drosophila Transcriptome.TalkNucleic Acids. Gordon Conference2011Biddeford, ME
The developmental transcriptome of Drosophila melanogasterTalkGenome Biology, Beyond the Genome2010Boston, MA
Alternative Splicing in Drosophila.TalkUniversity of Vermont2010University of Vermont
Alternative Splicing in Drosophila.TalkLawrence Berkeley National Labs2010Berkeley, CA
Alternative Splicing in Drosophila.TalkUniversity of Connecticut Health Center2010Farmington, CT
MicroRNA-Seq reveals cocaine-regulated expression of striatal microRNAs.Poster40th Annual Meeting of the Society for Neuroscience2010San Diego, CA
Deep Sequencing of Schmidtea mediterranea Reveals Strain-specific Transcript Expression. PosterGenome Informatics. Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory/Wellcome Trust. 2010Hingston, UK
Using RNAi and RNA-Seq to Identify Alternative Exons Regulated by Individual RNA Binding Proteins and their Associated Regulatory Motifs. TalkISMB2010Boston, MA
Using RNAi and RNA-Seq to identify alternative exons regulated by individual RNA binding proteins and their associated regulatory motifs.TalkFifteenth Annual Meeting of the RNA Society. 2010Seattle, Washington
Dynamics and Diversity of the Drosophila Transcriptome.TalkBeyond the Genome. International Conference2010Boston, MA
Dynamics and Diversity of the Drosophila Transcriptome.TalkGordon Conference2010Newport, RI
The Regulation of Alternative Splicing.TalkAnnual Meeting of the RNA Society2010Seattle, WA
Alternative Splicing in Human Embryonic Stem Cells.TalkState of Connecticut Stem Cell Retreat2010New Haven, CT
Dynamics and Diversity of the Drosophila Transcriptome.TalkCold Spring Harbor Laboratories2010Cold Spring Harbor, NY
Dynamics and Diversity of the Drosophila Transcriptome.TalkCold Spring Harbor Laboratories2010Cold Spring Harbor, NY
Alternative Splicing in Drosophila.TalkRNA Center, Case Western Reserve University2009Cleveland, OH
Alternative Splicing in Drosophila.TalkUniversity of Massachusetts2009Amherst, Massachusetts
Alternative Splicing in Drosophila.TalkWesleyan University2009 Middletown, CT
Alternative Splicing in Drosophila.TalkUniversity of Wisconsin2009Madison, Wisconsin
Alternative Splicing in Drosophila.TalkUniversity of Kentucky2009Kentucky
Alternative Splicing in Drosophila.TalkUniversity of Connecticut2009Storrs, Connecticut
Analysis of Dscam expression and mechanisms of alternative splicing. Eukaryotic mRNA Processing.PosterCold Spring Harbor Laboratory2009Cold Spring Harbor, NY
Drosophila development at single-nucleotide resolution. Eukaryotic mRNA Processing.PosterCold Spring Harbor Laboratory2009Cold Spring Harbor, NY
Using RNAi and RNA-Seq to identify alternative exons regulated by individual RNA binding proteins and their associated regulatory motifs. Eukaryotic mRNA Processing.TalkCold Spring Harbor Laboratory2009Cold Spring Harbor , NY
Alternative Trans-Splicing in Drosophila. Eukaryotic mRNA ProcessingTalkCold Spring Harbor Laboratory. 2009Cold Spring Harbor , NY
Modencode MeetingTalk2009Washington, DC
High Throughput Technologies for the Analysis of Alternative Splicing. TalkEuropean Alternative Splicing Network (EURASNET) Conference2009Valencia, Spain
Alternative Splicing of Dscam.TalkASBMB 2008 Annual Meeting2008San Diego, California
Alternative Splicing in Drosophila and miRNA-Mediated Gene Regulation in Planarians.TalkUniversity of North Carolina2008North Carolina
Alternative Splicing in Drosophila.Talk16th Annual International Conference on Intelligent Systems for Molecular Biology2008Toronto, Canada
Alternative Splicing in Drosophila.TalkCrete XVI EMBO Conference2008Crete (Greece)
Alternative Splicing of Dscam: The Making of 38,000 Isoforms.TalkInternational Centre for Genetic Engineering and Biotechnology2007Bariloche, Argentina
Alternative Splicing of Dscam: The Making of 38,000 Isoforms.TalkVIII Symposium. IBMC, 2007Porto, Portugal
Alternative Splicing in Drosophila and miRNA-Mediated Gene Regulation in Planarians.TalkUniversity of Toronto2007Toronto, Caneda
Alternative Splicing in Drosophila and miRNA-Mediated Gene Regulation in Planarians.TalkUniversity of Georgia2007Georgia
Alternative Splicing in Drosophila and miRNA-Mediated Gene Regulation in Planarians.TalkUniversity of Illinois2007Illinois
Alternative Splicing in Drosophila and miRNA-Mediated Gene Regulation in Planarians.TalkCold Spring Harbor Laboratory2007Cold Spring Harbor, NY
Pasilla, the Drosophila homolog of Nova-1 and -2 regulates sex-specific alternative trans-splicing. Eukaryotic mRNA Processing.PosterCold Spring Harbor Laboratory2007Cold Spring Harbor, NY
Musashi Regulates Dscam Alternative Splicing in Drosophila. Eukaryotic mRNA Processing.PosterCold Spring Harbor Laboratory2007Cold Spring Harbor, NY
Pasilla, Mub, and Bancal comprise a binary switch that regulated Dscam alternative splicing. TalkCold Spring Harbor Laboratory2007Cold Spring , NY
A Regulator of Mutually Exclusive Splicing Fidelity in Dscam. Eukaryotic mRNA Processing.TalkCold Spring Harbor Laboratory2007Cold Spring Harbor , NY
The Insect Down Syndrome Cell Adhesion Molecule (Dscam) Gene: The making and function of 38,000 isoforms.TalkGenome Canada, International Conference2006Quebec City, Canada
Alternative Splicing in Drosophila.TalkGordon Conference2006Oxford, UK
Alternative Splicing in Drosophila.TalkCrete XV EMBO Conference2006Crete (Greece)
Alternative Splicing in Human Embryonic Stem Cells.TalkState of Connecticut Stem Cell Retreat2006New Haven, CT
Alternative Splicing of the Drosophila Dscam gene: The making of 38,000 isoforms.TalkEMBO Conference on Alternative Transcript Diversity II2006Heidelberg, Germany
Alternative Splicing in Drosophila and miRNA-Mediated Gene Regulation in Planarians.TalkBoston College2006Boston, MA
Alternative Splicing in Drosophila and miRNA-Mediated Gene Regulation in Planarians.TalkBrandeis University2006Waltham, MA
“Alternative Splicing in Drosophila and miRNA-Mediated Gene Regulation in Planarians.TalkJohns Hopkins University2006Baltimore, MD
The microRNAs of the Planarian Schmidtea Mediterranea. PosterRNA 20062006Seattle, WA
The microRNAs of the Planarian Schmidtea Mediterranea.PosterCold Spring Harbor Symposium on Regulatory RNAs2006Cold Spring Harbor , NY
Alternative Splicing Regulators Identified in Drosophila Using High-Throughput Microarrays. TalkRNA 20062006Seattle, WA
Alternative Splicing of the Drosophila Dscam gene: The making of 38,000 isoforms.TalkNucleic Acids. Gordon Conference2005Newport, RI
Alternative Splicing of the Drosophila Dscam gene: The making of 38,000 isoforms.TalkUniversity of Massachusetts Medical School2005Worcester, MA
Alternative Splicing of the Drosophila Dscam gene: The making of 38,000 isoforms.TalkMichigan State University2005Michigan
Alternative Splicing of the Drosophila Dscam gene: The making of 38,000 isoforms.TalkUniversity of Pittsburgh2005Pittsburgh, PA
Alternative Splicing of the Drosophila Dscam gene: The making of 38,000 isoforms.TalkMassachusetts Institute of Technology2005Cambridge, MA
Alternative Splicing of the Drosophila Dscam gene: The making of 38,000 isoforms.TalkUniversity of California2005San Diego, CA
Microarray, and Chemical Biology Tools Designed to Study Alternative Splicing.TalkA conference sponsored by Exon-Hit Therapeutics2005Baltimore, MD
Identification of Planarian micoRNAs Required for Regeneration. Eukaryotic mRNA Processing.PosterCold Spring Harbor Laboratory2005Cold Spring Harbor, NY
A Mechanism for the Mutually Exclusive Splicing of the Insect Dscam Gene. Eukaryotic mRNA Processing. TalkCold Spring Harbor Laboratory2005Cold Spring Harbor , NY
The KH Domain Proteins PS and MUB Function to Regulated Alternative Splicing of the Drosophila Dscam Pre-mRNA. TalkCold Spring Harbor Laboratory2005Cold Spring Harbor, NY
Global Identification of Alternative Splicing Regulators and their Regulatory Targets in Drosophila Using High-Throughput Microarrays. Eukaryotic mRNA Processing.TalkCold Spring Harbor Laboratory2005Cold Spring Harbor, NY
A Mechanism for the Mutually Exclusive Splicing of the Insect Dscam Gene Deduced by Comparative Genomics. TalkRNA 20052005Banff, Canada,
Global Identification of Alternative Splicing Regulators and their Regulatory Targets in Drosophila Using High-Throughput Microarrays.TalkDrosophila Conference2005San Diego, CA
Dscam: The making of 38,000 isoforms.TalkGordon Conference2004Andover, NH
Wiring of the Drosophila nervous system and the regulation of Dscam alternative splicing.TalkBrandeis University2004Pikesville, MD
Wiring of the Drosophila nervous system and the regulation of Dscam alternative splicing.TalkUniversity of Vermont2004Vermont
The Regulation of Alternative Splicing in Drosophila.TalkUniversite de Sherbrooke2004Sherbrooke, QC, Canada
The Regulation of Alternative Splicing in Drosophila.TalkUniversity of Texas2004Texas
The Regulation of Alternative Splicing in Drosophila.TalkOhio State University2004Ohio
The Regulation of Alternative Splicing in Drosophila.TalkCase Western Reserve University2004Cleveland, OH
Alternative splicing of the Drosophila Dscam pre-mRNA.TalkRockefeller University2004New York, NY
The Regulation of Alternative Splicing in Drosophila.TalkUniversity of Connecticut Health Center2004Farmington, CT
TRA and TRA2 activate the female-specific 5’ splice site of the Drosophila fruitless pre-mRNA by counteracting a splicing repressor. PosterRNA 20042004Madison, WI
Identification of proteins participating in developmentally regulated alternative splicing of the Drosophila Dscam pre-mRNA. PosterRNA 20042004Madison, WI
A combined computational and experimental approach towards a priori identification of alternative exons. TalkRNA 20042004Madison, WI
A long-range secondary structure is required for exon inclusion in the Drosophila Dscam pre-mRNA. TalkRNA 20042004Madison, WI
A genome wide RNAi screen for RNA binding proteins that affect alternative splicing in Drosophila.TalkRNA 20042004Madison, WI
The Regulation of Alternative Splicing in Drosophila.TalkUniversity of Maryland2003Marylan
The regulation of alternative splicing of the Dscam pre-mRNA and its role in specifying neural wiring in Drosophila.TalkJohns Hopkins University2003 Baltimore, MD
Alternative Splicing of the Drosophila Dscam Pre-mRNA.TalkA conference sponsored by Exon-Hit Therapeutics2003Baltimore, MD
Evidence for multiple, recent exon duplication events in the insect Dscam genes. Eukaryotic mRNA processing.PosterCold Spring Harbor Laboratory2003Cold Spring Harbor, NY
Recursive splicing is required for Dscam alternative splicing. Eukaryotic mRNA processing.PosterCold Spring Harbor Laboratory2003Cold Spring Harbor, NY
Tra and Tra2 activate the female-specific 5’ splice site of the Drosophila fruitless pre-mRNA by counteracting a splicing repressor. TalkRNA 20032003Vienna, Austria
Comparing mechanisms of sex-specific 5’ and 3’ splice site activation. PosterRNA 20032003Vienna, Austria
Exon-Specific RNAi: A Tool for Dissecting the Functional Relevance of Alternative Splicing. PosterDrosophila 20032003Chicago, IL
The Identification of RNA Sequences Involved in the Regulation of Dscam Alternative Splicing.PosterDrosophila 20032003Chicago, IL
Tra and Tra2 activate the female-specific 5’ splice site of the Drosophila fruitless pre-mRNA by counteracting a splicing repressor. Eukaryotic mRNA processing.TalkCold Spring Harbor Laboratory2003Cold Spring Harbor, NY
Recursive splicing is required for Dscam alternative splicing.TalkRNA 20032003Vienna, Austria
Regulation of Dscam alternative splicing by B52 and U2AF. TalkDrosophila 20032003Chicago, IL
Alternative Splicing of the Drosophila Dscam Pre-mRNA.TalkOhio State University2002Ohio
Exonic Splicing Enhancers – “Determining their mechanism of action and harnessing their awesome power.TalkOhio State University2002Ohio
Alternative Splicing of the Drosophila Dscam pre-mRNA.TalkUCLA2002Los Angeles, California
Splicing and Dicing the Genome: Using Alternative Splicing to Create Extraordinary Protein Diversity.TalkNew York Medical College2002Valhala, New York
Splicing and Dicing the Genome: Using Alternative Splicing to Create Extraordinary Protein Diversity.TalkKarolinska Institut2002Stockholm, Sweden
Analysis of the potential contribution of SR proteins to poly(A) site recognition. PosterRNA 20022002Madison, WI
Alternative splicing of the Drosophila Dscam pre-mRNA. TalkRNA 20022002Madison, WI
Analysis of the potential contribution of SR proteins to poly(A) site recognition.PosterCold Spring Harbor Laboratory2001Cold Spring Harbor, New York
RS domain sequence requirements in enhancer-dependent splicing. Eukaryotic mRNA Processing.PosterCold Spring Harbor Laboratory2001Cold Spring Harbor, New York
Alternative splicing of pre-mRNAs encoding the axon guidance receptor Dscam is temporally and spatially regulated. PosterDrosophila 20012001
Defining the mechanisms regulating Dscam alternative splicing in DrosophIla. Eukaryotic mRNA ProcessingTalkCold Spring Harbor Laboratory2001Cold Spring Harbor, New York
Neurexins: A multigene family with really big introns. Genome sequencing and analysis. Poster2000
Defining the protein sequence requirements for RS domain function. RNA '00. PosterThe Fifth Annual Meeting of the RNA Society. University of Wisconsin2000Wisconsin, Madison
Evidence for the recruitment model for splicing activator function. Eukaryotic mRNA Processing.TalkCold Spring Harbor Laboratory1999Cold Spring Harbor, New York
The control of alternative pre-mRNA splicing with small molecule drugs. PosterRNA '99 The Fourth Annual Meeting of the RNA Society1999Edinburgh, Scottland
Parameters that influence the efficiency of splicing enhancers. PosterRNA '98. The Third Annual Meeting of the RNA Society. 1998Wisconsin, Madison
Parameters that influence the efficiency of splicing enhancers. PosterJane Coffin Childs Memorial Fund for Medical Research Fall Symposium1998Lakeville, Connecticut
An RS domain tethered to RNA can activate enhancer-dependent pre-mRNA splicing. Eukaryotic mRNA Processing.TalkCold Spring Harbor Laboratory1997Cold Spring Harbor, New York
RS domains function as activators of enhancer-dependent pre-mRNA splicing. PosterJane Coffin Childs Memorial Fund for Medical Research Fall Symposium1997Lakeville, Connecticut
An exploration of the sequence and structural requirements for poly(A) site recognition by in vitro selection. PosterRNA '96: The First Annual Meeting of the RNA Society. University of Wisconsin1996Wisconsin, Madison
Disruption of transcription initiation complexes during DNA replication in yeast.PosterCold Spring Harbor Laboratory1995Cold Spring Harbor, New York
Identification of upstream sequences that enhance pre-mRNA 3' processing. PosterCold Spring Harbor Laboratory1995Cold Spring Harbor, New York
CPSF recognition of an HIV-1 mRNA 3' processing enhancer: multiple sequence contacts involved in poly(A) site definition. TalkRNA Processing Meeting of the RNA Society. 1994Madison, Wisconsin
The upstream element of the HIV-1 poly(A) site enhances processing efficiency through the stabilization of the interaction of CPSF with the core poly(A) site. RNA 3' Ends: Formation and Function. Talk1993Oxford, UK