Ulrike W. Klueh, Ph.D.

Associate Professor, Surgery
Academic Office Location:
Surgery
University of Connecticut Health Center
263 Farmington Avenue
Farmington, CT 06030-3955
Phone: 860-679-2859
Fax: 860-679-2936

RESEARCH INTERESTS
Use of molecular tissue engineering for enhancing biocompatibility of implantable devices and their products including:


Re-design transdermal glucose sensors to extend the functional lifespan in vivo

Development of new generations of totally implantable glucose sensors, utilizing ASIC and RF telemetry

Developing new strategies and devices to extend insulin and infusion sets

Development of closed loop technology for clinical management of patients with diabetes

Development of novel composite meshes for hernia repair

Education
DegreeInstitutionMajor
Ph.D.University of ConnecticutBiomedical Engineering
M.S.University of ConnecticutChemical Engineering
B.S.Fachhochschule Giessen-Friedberg (University for Applied Science)Biotechnology
R.N.University Clinic of Wuerzburg, School of NursingNursing

Post-Graduate Training
TrainingInstitutionSpecialty
InternshipUniversity of ConnecticutVisiting Research Scholar Internship: Department of Molecular and Cell Biology Title: “Purification of a Depolymerase from Fusarium moniliforme using HPLC” (Thesis research as required for Biotechnology degree, Fachhochschule Giessen-Friedberg)
FellowshipUniversity of ConnecticutVisiting Research Scholar Fellowship: Fermentation and Separation Laboratory, Thesis Title: “Purification of a Depolymerase from Fusarium moniliforme using HPLC” (Thesis research as required for Biotechnology degree, Fachhochschule Giessen-Friedberg)
FellowshipUniversity of Connecticut, School of MedicineCenter for Molecular Tissue Engineering

Awards
Name of Award/HonorAwarding Organization
Junior Faculty Award, “Uses of Stem Cells to Enhance Glucose Sensor Function in Vivo"American Diabetes Association
Invited to speak at the pre-meeting workshop entitled, “Workshop B – Advances in Continuous Glucose Monitoring”, Bethesda, Maryland Tenth Diabetes Technology Meeting
Student Award for Outstanding Research in the Doctoral Degree Category. Award presented at the Society for Biomaterials Meeting in Reno, Nevada, April 30 – May 3, 2003Society for Biomaterials
Excellence in Teaching AwardFarmington High School
Student Award for Outstanding Research in the Masters Science Degree category. Award presented at the Society for Biomaterials Meeting in Minneapolis, MNSociety for Biomaterials
Dorothy and Earl S. Hoffman Travel Scholarship. AVS 47th International Symposium held in Boston, MassachusettsAmerican Vacuum Society
Name & DescriptionCategoryRoleTypeScopeStart YearEnd Year
NIH Workshop on Innovation Towards an Artificial Pancreas, NIH campus, Bethesda, MDWorkshop/ConferencePanel member ExternalNational2013
Journal of Diabetes Science and Technology symposium on “Physiology of Interstitial Fluid (ISF)”Workshop/ConferenceInvited Co-Editor ExternalNational20102011
American Diabetes Association, Connecticut LeadershipAdvisory CommitteeBoard MemberExternalNational20092011
Diabetes UK (The British Diabetic Association), London, UKAdvisory CommitteeGrant reviewer ExternalInternational2007
Acta BiomaterialiaProfessional/Scientific JournalReviewerExternalNational
BiomaterialsProfessional/Scientific JournalReviewerExternalNational
Biotechnology ProgressProfessional/Scientific JournalReviewerExternalNational
Diabetes CareProfessional/Scientific JournalReviewerExternalNational
Diabetes Science & TechnologyProfessional/Scientific JournalReviewerExternalNational
Diabetes Technology & TherapeuticProfessional/Scientific JournalReviewerExternalNational
NanomedicineProfessional/Scientific JournalReviewerExternalNational
SensorsProfessional/Scientific JournalReviewerExternalNational
Tissue EngineeringProfessional/Scientific JournalReviewerExternalNational

Journal Articles

Abstracts

  • Critical Role of Macrophage Chemokines in Controlling Continuous Glucose Monitoring (CGM) in Vivo.
    U Klueh, Jackman Frailey, Omar Antar, Y. Qiao and DL Kreutzer Diabetes Techonology Society, 12th Scientific Meeting, Bethesda, MD 2012 Nov;
  • Central Role of Macrophages in Controlling Long Term Continuous Glucose Monitoring in Vivo
    U Klueh, Y. Qiao and DL Kreutzer BMES Hartford Connecticut 2011 Oct;
  • Mast Cells, Macrophages and Continuous Glucose Monitoring in Vivo
    U Klueh, M. Kaur, Y. Qiao and DL Kreutzer Diabetes Techonology Society, 9th Scientific Meeting, San Francisco, CA 2009 Nov;
  • Activation of Human Mononuclear Cells by Porcine Biologic Meshes in Vitro
    S. Orenstein MD, Y. Qiao MD, M. Kaur BS, U. Klueh PhD, Don Kreutzer, Yuri Novitsky 16th Annual NESS Surgical Resident and Fellow Research Presentation Day (New England Surgical Society). Boston, MA 2009 May;
  • Activation of human monocytes by human biologic meshes in vitro.
    S. Orenstein, M. Kaur, U. Klueh PhD, D. Kreutzer, Y. Novitsky Association for Academic Surgery Society of University Surgeons. Academic Surgical Congress, Fort Myers, FL 2009 Feb;
  • Activation of human monocytes by human biologic meshes in vitro.
    S. Orenstein, M. Kaur, U. Klueh, D. Kreutzer, Y. Novitsky CTACSPA (Connecticut Chapter of the American College of Surgeons Professional Association). Waterbury, CT 2008 Oct;
  • Polypeptide Multilayer Nanocoatings for Cell Culture and Implant Devices
    DeRome ME, N. Palath, K. Dave, JS Rudra, S. Bhad, U Klueh, DL Kreutzer, DT Haynie Nanomedicine: Nanotechnology, Biology and Medicine 2007 Dec;3(4):353-354
  • Development and Validation of a Murine Model of Implantable Glucose Sensor in the Type I (Juvenile) Diabetic Mouse.
    Platt K, E. Hubert, DL Kreutzer, U. Klueh Medi2005 BEACON, Hartford Connecticut 2005 Oct;
  • Role of Inflammation in Glucose Sensor Function in Vivo.
    Kaur M, D. Montrose, D. Kreutzer, U. Klueh Medi2005 BEACON, Hartford Connecticut October 2005 2005 Oct;
  • Use of Vascular Endothelial Cell Growth Factor Gene Transfer to Enhance Biosensor Function in Vivo.
    Klueh U, D. Dorsky, D. L. Kreutzer Transactions 2003 Society for Biomaterials. 2003 Jan;
  • Uses Of Collagen Related Peptides and Bacterial Related Peptides To Bind And Orient Fibronectin On Surfaces.
    Klueh U, S. Goralnick, J. D. Bryers, D. L. Kreutzer Transactions 2001 Society for Biomaterials. 2001 Jan;
  • Use of Bacterial Adhesion Related and Collagen Related Peptides to Bind and Orient Fibronectin on Surfaces.
    Klueh U, S. Goralnick, J. D. Bryers, D. L. Kreutzer American Vacuum Society. 47th International Symposium 2000 Oct;
  • Characterization of Ligand (Fibronectin) Orientation Once Tethered to Surfaces by Self-Assembled Monolayers.
    Klueh U, J. D. Bryers, D. L. Kreutzer UWEB Summer Symposium 2000. Seattle, Washington. 2000 Jan;
  • Efficacy of Silver-Coated Dacron Fabric to Reduce Colonization by Staphylococcus epidermidis Bacteria in Static Batch and Flowing Fluid Conditions.
    Klueh U, Wagner V, Kelly S, Johnson A, Bryers JD Sixth World Biomaterials Congress Transactions. 2000 Society for Biomaterials. 2000 Jan;
  • Efficacy of Silver-Coated Dacron to Reduce Colonization by Staphylococcus epidermidis Bacteria: Use of a Continuous System.
    Wagner V, Klueh U, Kelly S, Johnson A, Bryers JD Sixth World Biomaterials Congress Transactions. 2000 Society for Biomaterials. 2000 Jan;

Conference Papers

Title or AbstractTypeSponsor/EventDate/YearLocation
Inflammation, Macrophages and CGM TalkConnecticut Children Medical Center2013Hartford, CT
“Bridging” to the Cure for DiabetesTalkFood and Drug Administration 2012Silver Spring, MD
Critical Role of Macrophage Chemokines in Controlling Continuous Glucose Monitoring (CGM) in Vivo.TalkDiabetes Techonology Society, 12th Scientific Meeting2012Bethesda, MD
The Role of Macrophages in Continuous Glucose Monitoring. TalkThe 5th International Conference on Advanced Technologies & Treatments for 2012Barcelona, Spain
Role of Interleukin 1 / Interleukin 1 Receptor Antagonist in Long-Term Continuous Glucose Monitoring in Vivo. Talk11th Annual Diabetes Technology Meeting, Burlingame, California2011
Role of Interleukin 1 / Interleukin 1 Receptor Antagonist in Long-Term Continuous Glucose Monitoring in Vivo. Talk11th Annual Diabetes Technology Meeting2011Burlingame, California
Central Role of Macrophages in Controlling Long Term Continuous Glucose Monitoring in Vivo.TalkBMES 2011Hartford Connecticut
Identifying and overcoming tissue responses that compromise implantable glucose sensor function and continuous glucose monitoring (CGM). TalkBD Medical2011Boston
Insulin Induced Tissue Reaction Associated with Insulin PumpsTalkBD Technologies2010Research Triangle Park, North Carolina
“Workshop B – Advances in Continuous Glucose Monitoring"TalkTenth Diabetes Technology Meeting2010Bethesda, Maryland
Continuous Glucose Monitoring Beyond 7 days.TalkBD Technologies2010Research Triangle Park, NC
Mast Cells, Macrophages and Continuous Glucose Monitoring in VivoTalkDiabetes Techonology Society2009San Francisco, California
Key Role of Mast Cells in Controlling Glucose Sensor Function in VivoTalkAmerican Diabetes Association2009New Orleans, Louisiana
Activation of Human Mononuclear Cells by Porcine Biologic Meshes in VitroTalkNew England Surgical Society2009Boston, Massachusetts
Activation of Human Monocytes by Human Biologic Meshes In VitroTalkAssociation for Academic Surgery Society of University Surgeons2009Fort Myers, Florida
The Artificial Pancreas: Hope and HurtlesTalkAmerican Diabetes Association2009Middletown, Connecticut
Activation of Human Monocytes by Human Biologic Meshes In VitroTalkCTACSPA2008Waterbury, Connecticut
Uses of Stem Cells to Enhance Glucose Sensor Function in VivoTalkAmerican Diabetes Association2008Middletown, Connecticut
Investigations into the Causes of Post Insertion Variability (PIV) Observed in vivo with the Abbott Navigator Glucose SensorTalkAbbott Diabetes Care2007Alameda, California
Mouse Model of Implantable Glucose SensorTalkBRM Biomedical Research Models, Inc.2007Worcester, Massachusetts
Continuous Blood Glucose Monitoring in Normal and Diabetic Mice using Implantable Glucose SensorsTalkJackson Laboratories2006Bar Harbor, Maine
Glucose Sensor Function in Vitro and in VivoTalkAbbott-TheraSense Inc.2005Oakland, California
Evaluation of Tissue Responses and Glucose Sensor Function in Vivo Utilizing a Murine ModelTalkAbbott-TheraSense Inc.2005Oakland, California
Enhancing Implantable Sensor Function in Vivo Using Gene Transfer and Bio-Hydrogel SystemsTalkDexcom Inc.2004San Diego, California
Implantable Sensors from a Tissues ViewpointTalkAbbott Laboratories2004Chicago, Illinois
Uses of Local Gene Transfer to Enhance Sensor Function in VivoPlenary LectureUniversity of Washington Engineered Biomaterials Symposium 2004Seattle, Washington
Use of Mouse Model for Wireless-Telemetry for Implantable Glucose SensorsTalkDigital Angels2003Riverside, California
Use of Mouse Model for Wireless-Telemetry for Implantable Glucose SensorsTalkDigital Angels2003Riverside, California
Use of Gene Transfer and Wireless-Telemetry for Implantable Glucose SensorsTalkDigital Angels2003Riverside, California
Molecular Tissue Engineering and Implantable SensorsTalkAdvanced Digital Solutions2003Palm Beach, Florida
Use of Ex Ova Chick Embryo Model for Evaluation of Tissue Response Modifiers in vivoTalkBoston Scientific2003Boston, Massachusetts
Use of Vascular Endothelial Cell Growth Factor Gene Transfer To Enhance Biosensor Function In VivoTalkBoston Scientific2003Boston, Massachusetts
The Ex Ova Chick Embryo Model and its Uses in Biomaterials EvaluationTalkBoston Scientific2001Boston, Massachusetts