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Photo of Vladimir I. Rodionov, Ph.D.

Vladimir I. Rodionov, Ph.D.

Professor, Department of Cell Biology
Center for Cell Analysis and Modeling
Academic Office Location:
R.D.Berlin Center for Cell Analysis and Modeling
UConn Health
400 Farmington Avenue
Farmington, CT 06030-6406
Phone: 860-679-1850
Fax: 860-679-1039
Website(s):

Cell Biology Graduate Program

Cell Analysis and Modeling Graduate Program

Education
DegreeInstitutionMajor
B.Sc.Moscow State University Molecular Biology
Ph.D.Moscow State UniversityBiochemistry

Awards
Name of Award/HonorAwarding Organization
Research Award for Eastern Europe Howard Hughes Medical Institute
Academic degree Doctor of Sciences in Cell Biology, Supreme Attestation Committe of the Russia(formal requirement for professorship in Russia)
Name & DescriptionCategoryRoleTypeScopeStart YearEnd Year
Sigma Delta Epsilon-Graduate Women in Science Program. Editorial BoardAd Hoc ReviewerExternalNational2010
Programme BLANC, Agence Nationale De La Recherche (France). Editorial BoardAd Hoc ReviewerExternalInternational2010
National Institute of Health (Nuclear and Cytoplasmic Structure and Dynamics Scientific Review Group). Editorial BoardMemberExternalNational2010
Curriculum Committee; Medical Students Course “Human Biology”. Education CommitteeMemberUConn HealthUniversity2008
Wellcome Trust (UK). Editorial BoardAd Hoc ReviewerExternalInternational2008
National Institutes of Health (Cell Structure and Function Scientific Review Group). Advisory CommitteeMemberExternalNational2007
The Netherlands Organization for Health Research and Development. Editorial BoardAd Hoc ReviewerExternalInternational2007
UK Cancer Research Foundation. Editorial BoardAd Hoc ReviewerExternalNational20072008
Human Frontiers Science Program. Editorial BoardAd Hoc ReviewerExternalNational2007
National Science Foundation (Cellular Organization). Education CommitteeAd Hoc ReviewerExternalNational20062010
Faculty of 1000Professional/Scientific OrganizationContributorExternalNational2003
National Science Foundation (Cellular Organization). Advisory CommitteePanel memberExternalNational20032006
Faculty Search Committee, Center for Biomedical Imaging Technology Advisory CommitteeMemberUConn HealthUniversity2002
Graduate School Admission Committee Advisory CommitteeMemberUConn HealthUniversity20022005
Curriculum Committee; Graduate Course “Advanced Microscopy Techniques”Education CommitteeMemberUConn HealthUniversity2002
Dental Council. Education CommitteeAt-Large RepresentativeUConn HealthUniversity20012004
Graduate School Cell Biology Curriculum Review Committee. Education CommitteeCommittee MemberUConn HealthUniversity1999
Biophysical Society Professional/Scientific OrganizationMemberExternalNational1997
National Science Foundation (Cellular Organization). Editorial BoardAd Hoc ReviewerExternalNational19972002
American Society for Cell Biology Professional/Scientific OrganizationMemberExternalNational1993
Research in this laboratory is focused on molecular mechanisms of intracellular transport and organization of microtubule cytoskeleton. The model system that is being used is melanophores, pigment cells of lower vertebrates. The only function of these large cells is synchronous transport of thousands of membrane-bounded organelles, pigment granules, which rapidly move to the cell center to form a tight aggregate or redisperse uniformly throughout the cytoplasm. During aggregation, pigment granules move along microtubules by means of cytoplasmic dynein. Pigment dispersion involves initial rapid microtubule-dependent transport to the periphery by Kinesin II and subsequent slow diffusion-like movement along the randomly arranged actin filaments. Transport is regulated by Protein Kinase A (PKA) signaling cascade. Thus, melanophores provide a unique model system for the studies of the role of cytoskeleton in intracellular transport, mechanisms of switching between the two major transport systems, and regulation of activity of motor molecules by signal transduction mechanisms.


Two recent findings define the directions of current research. First, we have shown that in microsurgically produced cytoplasmic fragments of melanophores lacking the centrosome the radial array of microtubules rapidly forms and becomes positioned to the center. Thus, membrane organelles that are normally dragged by motors to the centrosome region may themselves play an active role in organization and maintenance of radial microtubules. Digital fluorescence microscopy, photobleaching , photoactivation and microinjection of motor-specific probes are being used to test the mechanisms of self-organization and self-centering of the radial microtubule array in the fragments. Second, we have demonstrated that during dispersion the pigment granules that initially move along microtubules switch tracks and continue motion along randomly arranged actin filaments. Thus, each pigment granule bears a member of each of the families of motor molecules: cytoplasmic dynein and a kinesin-like motors (specific for microtubules) and a myosin motor (specific for actin filaments). A combination of biochemical and molecular approaches are being used to test the hypothesis that the motor molecules interact and that regulation is achieved through phosphorylation of common subunits.


Not accepting lab rotation students at this time


Lab Rotation Projects

1. Identification of Protein Kinase A adapter proteins (AKAPs). Our recent work indicates that PKA is bound to pigment granules and that this binding is mediated by adapter proteins know as AKAPs. A combination of biochemical, molecular, and mass-spectrometry approaches will be used to identify AKAPs that tie PKA to pigment granule surface and determine the role of PKA compartmentalization in pigment transport.


2. Mechanism of regulation of Kinesin II. Our preliminary data strongly suggest that the activity of kinesin II during dispersion is stimulated by PKA-dependent phosphrylation. Mass-spectrometry, site-directed mutagenesis, and microscopy approaches will be used to identify phosphorylation sites and determine the importance of Kinesin II regulation for pigment dispersion.


3. The role of actin dynamics in pigment dispersion. During dispersion, pigment granules move along the actin filaments by means of myosin Va. Based on our data we hypothesize that this actin-dependent transport involves continuous growth of actin filaments. Live imaging approaches will be used to test this hypothesis and determine whether actin assembly is coupled to myosin V activity.

Journal Articles

Abstracts

  • Search-and-capture of membrane organelles by dynamic microtubules is required for initiation of dynein-dependent transport.
    Lomakin, A., I.Semenova, E.Nadezhdina, A.Akhmanova, and V.Rodionov 47th Annual Meeting of the American Society for Cell Biology 2007 Jan;Abstract #694
  • Identification of AKAPs involved in regulation of pigment transport in melanophores
    Semenova, I., P.Ivanov, and V.Rodionov Mol. Biol. Cell 2005 Jan;16448a
  • Computational model of pigment transport in fish melanophores
    Slepchenko, B.M., E.Jackson, I.Semenova, and V.Rodionov Mol. Biol. Cell 2004 Jan;15404a
  • Microtubule sliding induced by microtubule-dependent motor Ncd
    Oladipo, A., and V.Rodionov Mol. Biol. Cell 2004 Jan;1533a
  • Multiscale trend analysis of microtubule-dependent transport in melanophores
    Zaliapin, I., I.Semenova, A.Kashina, and V.Rodionov Mol. Biol. Cell 2004 Jan;15403a
  • Centering force generation in cytoplasmic fragments of melanophores
    Malikov, V., and V.I. Rodionov Mol. Biol. Cell 2003 Jan;14449a
  • Signaling molecules form a complex with molecular motors that is essential for regulation of organelle transport
    Kashina, A.S., E.Potekhina, I.Semenova, and V.Rodionov Mol. Biol. Cell 2003 Jan;14332a
  • Modulation of cAMP levels to control transfer between microtubule and actin-based transport
    Rodionov, V., J.Yi, A.Oladipo, A.Kashina, and S.Gross Mol. Biol. Cell 2002 Jan;13473a
  • Nucleation of microtubules by cytoplasmic dynein
    Malikov, V., and V.I.Rodionov Mol. Biol. Cell 2002 Jan;1343a
  • The nature of the centering force
    Burakov, A.V., E.S.Nadezhdina, and V.I.Rodionov Mol. Biol. Cell 2002 Jan;13199a
  • Self-organization of a radial microtubule array in cytoplasmic fragments of melanophores involves the formation of a new microtubule-organizing center.
    Vorobjev, I.A., V.P.Malikov, and V.I.Rodionov. Mol. Biol. Cell 2000 Jan;11360a

Conference Papers

  • Activation of the minus-end-directed microtubule transport of pigment granules in melanophores correlates with CK1-dependent phosphorylation of the dynein intermediate chain
    O.Zhapparova, K.Ikeda, I.Brodsky, I.Semenova, I.Zaliapin, and V.Rodionov 2010 Jan;Abstract #2015
  • Capture of membrane organelles by the growing microtubule plus-ends is facilitated by readjustment of microtubule dynamics inducing accumulation of microtubule plus-ends at the cell periphery.
    P.Kraikivski, P., A.Lomakin, I.Semenova, I.Zaliapin, B.Slepchenko, A.Akhmanova, and V.Rodionov 2010 Jan;Abstract #2016
  • Regulation of microtubule dynamics enhances capture of pigment granules by growing microtubule ends during pigment aggregation in melanophores.
    Kraikivski, P., A.Lomakin, I.Semenova, E.Nadezhdina, A.Akhmanova, and V.Rodionov 2010 Jan;
  • Regulation of microtubule dynamics enhances capture of pigment granules by growing microtubule ends during pigment aggregation in melanophores.
    Kraikivski, P., A.Lomakin, I.Semenova, I.Zaliapin, E.Nadezhdina, A.Akhmanova, and V.Rodionov 2009 Jan;Abstract #1865
  • Signaling unit composed PP2A and CK1 is responsible for a rapid increase in the minus-end runs of pigment granules along microtubules during pigment aggregation in melanophores.
    Ikeda, K., I.Brodsky, I.Semenova, E.Nadezhdina, I.Zaliapin, and V.Rodionov 2009 Jan;Abstract #1864.
  • Moesin anchors protein kinase A on pigment granules to regulate pigment dispersion in melanophores.
    Ikeda, K., I.Semenova, P.Ivanov, and V.Rodionov 2008 Jan;Abstract #306.
  • Regulaiton of the CLIP-170-dependent interaction of membrane organelles with the plus ends of cytoplasmic microtubules essential for initiation of the minus-end directed transport.
    Lomakin, A., I.Semenova, E.Nadezhdina, A.Akhmanova, and V.Rodionov 2008 Jan;Abstract #298

Short Surveys

Title or AbstractTypeSponsor/EventDate/YearLocation
Regulation of intracellular transport in melanophoresTalkPhysiology Course2010Marine Biological Laboratory, Woods Hole
Regulation of intracellular transport in melanophoresTalkPhysiology Course2010Marine Biological Laboratory, Woods Hole
Regulation of molecular motors in melanophores Cargo transport by single molecular motors Talk53d Annual Meeting of the Biophysical Society Symposium2009Boston, MA
Intracellular transport in black and white TalkNHLBI Seminar2009Washington, D.C.
Intracellular transport in black and white TalkCenter for Non-linear Dynamics Seminar2009University of Austin, TX.
Intracellular transport in black and white TalkSeminar2007Albert Einstein College of Medicine, New York.
Intracellular transport in black and white TalkMusculoskeletal Institute Seminar2007 University of Pennsylvania.
Computational modeling of pigment transport in melanophores Talk44th Annual Meeting of the American Society for Cell Biology2004Washington, D.C.
Motile and Contractile Systems Centrosome positioning is maintained by opposing forces generated by actomyosin system and cytoplasmic dynein TalkGordon Research Conference 2003
Regulation and coordination of molecular motors in melanophoresTalkMarine Biological Laboratory2003Woods Hole, MA
Microtubule arrays, Cytomechanical modulesTalkFriday Harbor Laboratories2003
Finding the center of a fragment Talk41st Annual Meeting of the American Society for Cell Biology 2000Washington, D.C.
Coordination of microtubule- and actin-dependent transport in melanophores TalkSeminar in the University of Linkoping1999Sweden
Self-organization of the radial microtubule array TalkSeminar in the Swiss Federal Institute of Technology1999Lausanne (Switzerland)
Organization of Cytoplasm by Molecular Motors TalkSeminar in the Queens College, New York 1998Queens College, New York
Organization of Cytoplasm by Molecular Motors TalkSeminar in the Dept. of Biology1998Louisiana State University
Organization of Cytoplasm by Molecular MotorsTalkSeminar in the Northwestern University Medical School 1998Northwestern University Medical School
“Motile and Contractile Systems” “Centrosomal control of microtubule dynamics”. TalkGordon Research Conference 1998
Self-Centering Activity of Cytoplasm TalkSeminar in the Dept. of Anatomy1996Indiana University Medical School
Microtubule dynamics in fish melanophores Talk32nd Annual Meeting of the American Society For Cell Biology1991Boston
Mechanisms of motion of pigment granules in melanophores TalkSeminar in the Dept. of Physicians and Surgeons1990Columbia University