Photo of Jean-Denis  Beaudoin, Ph.D.

Jean-Denis Beaudoin, Ph.D.

Assistant Professor of Genetics and Genome Sciences
Academic Office Location:
Genetics and Genome Sciences
UConn Health
263 Farmington Avenue
Farmington, CT 06030-6403
Phone: 860-679-3027
Website(s):

Genetics and Genome Sciences

Genetics and Developmental Biology Graduate Program

Beaudoin Lab Page

Education
DegreeInstitutionMajor
DiplomaCégep de Lévis-LauzonChemistry-Biology
B.Sc.Université de SherbrookeBiotechnology (Molecular Biology)
Ph.D.Université de SherbrookeBiochemistry
PostdocYale UniversityGenetics

Post-Graduate Training
TrainingInstitutionSpecialty
PostdoctoralYale Medical SchoolGenetics

Awards
Name of Award/HonorAwarding Organization
Pathway to Independence Award (K99/R00)National Institute of Health
Postdoctoral FellowshipFonds de la Recherche en Santé du Québec (FRSQ)
National Poster - Silver AwardCanadian Student Health Research Forum (CSHRF)
Nominated to Attend the Canadian Student Health Research Forum (CSHRF) National Poster CompetitionCanadian Student Health Research Forum (CSHRF)
Dean's Honor ListUniversité de Sherbrooke
Ph.D. StudentshipCanadian Institutes of Health Research (CIHR)
Ph.D. StudentshipFonds de la Recherche en Santé du Québec (FRSQ)
Jean-Marie Beauregard Award for Best Poster Presentation at the Annual Scientific Symposium of the Faculty of Medicine and Health SciencesUniversity of Sherbrooke
Dean's Honor ListUniversité de Sherbrooke
Master StudentshipFonds de la Recherche en Santé du Québec (FRSQ)
Master StudentshipCanadian Institutes of Health Research (CIHR)
Honorable Mention Awards at the Faculty of Science (Fall Term)University of Sherbrooke
Summer Studentship - Faculty of Medicine and Health SciencesUniversité de Sherbrooke
Summer StudentshipNatural Sciences and Engineering Research Council of Canada (NSERC)
Honorable Mention Awards at the Faculty of Science (Summer Term)University of Sherbrooke

Research in our lab stems from two captivating biological observations that appear unrelated at first sight. The first is the fascinating process by which two of the most specialized and highly differentiated animal cells, the sperm and the oocyte, come together and transition to a completely naïve state from which they differentiate to form all the different cell types and tissues required to create a brand-new animal. This fundamental process of embryonic development is universal across the animal kingdom.

At a whole different scale, at the level of molecules, we find that transcripts of RNA coordinate the flow of information circulating within a cell. The central role of RNA in biology is enabled by a broad diversity of RNA functions. RNA acts as a template for the construction of proteins. RNA operates as a platform to bind various factors to regulate gene expression. RNA also constitutes the backbone of some of the most important machineries found within the cell, such as the ribosome, the telomerase enzyme, the RNAse P, tRNAs, the splicosome, and many others. Consider now that RNA is a polymer of four simple monomers; it is striking how such complex functions can arise from simple rearrangements of four base components. One thing is often forgotten, though. It is impossible to dissociate RNA function from RNA structure. RNA structure provides a fundamental regulatory layer of RNA activities.

In our lab, we are inspired by these two phenomena of dynamic cellular transitions during development and the role of RNA structure in governing the flow of cellular information. We aim to characterize RNA structure and functions to better understand vertebrate development. To this end, our lab uses the zebrafish and human cell lines as model systems, and we integrate an array of approaches that includes RNA molecular biology, computational biology, high throughput sequencing, genome-engineering, genetics, and developmental biology.

The Beaudoin lab is actively recruiting


The Beaudoin lab is currently building its team! The lab will open in January 2020 and it is your chance to become an active and important member of this new exciting team. We aim to build a diverse and collaborative team where each individual brings something different and has room to grow scientifically and professionally. If you want to share your passion for science with Jean-Denis and the rest of the team, you are more than welcome to apply for a position in our group. We are particularly looking to recruit a research technician, multiple postdocs, and graduate students. Funding for our open positions is available from our start-up and NIH Pathway to Independence (K99/R00) award.


Open Positions


If you have questions about any of these positions, please email Jean-Denis.


Postdoctoral researchers


Postdoc positions are available for experienced scientists in RNA biology, Biochemistry, Cellular Biology, Computational Biology or Developmental Biology. Our lab is seeking both molecular biologists and computational biologists.

For molecular biologists, we seek experimental experience in one or more of these skills:



  • RNA probing/structure

  • Zebrafish system (e.g. development, microinjection, genetics, genome engineering techniques)

  • Microscopy techniques (confocal, high resolution, etc.)

  • Cell culture techniques (transfection, gene expression analysis, stem cell differentiation, etc.)

  • Translation regulation

  • High throughput approaches and sequencing (e.g. RNA-seq, Ribo-seq, massive parallel reporter assay, RNA-protein and RNA-RNA interactions)

  • Liquid-liquid phase separation and/or intrinsically disordered proteins


For computational biologists, we seek computational experience in one or more of these skills:



  • Analysis of high throughput sequencing data (e.g. nanopore, RNA-seq, Ribo-seq, massive parallel reporter assay, RNA-protein and RNA-RNA interactions)

  • Proficient script writing (ideally in Python or R)

  • Statistical analysis

  • RNA structure prediction

  • Machine learning (e.g. Neural networks, random forests, etc.)


The ideal candidates would have a mixture of both experimental and computational experience. To apply please send a Cover Letter describing past research accomplishments and future research interests and career goal, your CV, and a list of three references in an email to Jean-Denis.


Graduate students


UConn Graduate students in the Biomedical Science PhD Program are encourage to rotate in the lab. If you are an admitted graduate student with an interest to learn about RNA biology, genetics, computational biology, genomics or developmental biology in a collaborative and stimulating environment, you should email Jean-Denis as early as possible about rotation opportunities and possible projects.

Undergraduates who are looking to pursue a PhD must first apply to the PhD In Biomedical Science.


Research technician


We are looking for someone independent and creative to maintain the fish facility, order lab supplies, and help out with various projects around the lab. This position includes the opportunity for independent projects for candidates pursuing a research career. Candidates should have (or be pursuing) a bachelors degree in Biology or a related field.

Past experience in fish husbandry or in a research lab is excellent, but if you are eager to learn, proactive and interested in the kind of things we do, you are more than welcome to apply. Please email Jean-Denis with a Cover Letter, your CV, and a list of three references.

Accepting Lab Rotation Students: Summer '20, Fall '20, Spring '21

UConn Health graduate students in the Biomedical Science PhD program are encouragged to rotate in the lab. If you are an admitted graduate student with an interest to learn about RNA biology, genetics, computational biology, genomics or developmental biology in a collaborative and stimulating environment, email Dr. Beaudoin as early as possible about rotation opportunities and possible projects.

Undergraduate students who are looking to pursue a PhD must first apply to and be accepted into the PhD in Biomedical Science program.